© 2017 BestChapter.com  Samuel J Alibrando

If It is Code, It is Communication

July 4, 2017

 

 

What gets decoded? Answer: Messages, communication.

 

During war time, all sides were trying to decode the enemy's messages. Why? Decoding to determine what is being intentionally communicated.

 

As recently as the past quarter century, DNA has been almost decoded. Now think about that. Have you ever heard of anyone decoding something that is not language? Of course not.

 

With DNA, the information is so critically important to your life, but my point is, it truly is a massively sophisticated code. 

 

There is order on such a high level that it is far more complex than any spoken language. An entire 6 feet of DNA coding is on the inside of every human cell. That is no typo, it is six feet long. All the protein parts of DNA are made from molecules, all the molecules are made from atoms: precise nanotechnology.

 

Decoding DNA is more like the study of an alien language having capabilities beyond our understanding. 

 

It was on the assumption of intentional communication that scientists began decoding DNA and on that assumption they discovered a sensational amount of information. In fact, I doubt any man-made communications system could handle the spectacular amount of communication going on in your body every minute of your life.

 

Now, of course, we’re not yet smart enough to make a synthetic strand of functioning DNA but we are beginning to play with what we are identifying.  “What if take this, move it here? What if we take that and copy this?”

 

 

The excitement in the molecular biology field is justified. What a treasure hunt for students of nature to partially uncover yet another one of nature’s brilliant secrets.

 

So much wisdom inside every one of us. DNA dictating, directing, maintaining standards, overseeing cell reproduction. Six feet of outrageously fantastic coded information in every one of our own cells.

 

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